Laissez Faire Links: Myths Agaisnt Capitalism, Obamacare, Budget Talks, and the Index of Economic Freedom

Myths against capitalism, Doctors under Obamacare, budget cuts in lieu of growing government (how can that be?), and a decline in economic freedom for Americans are up for discussion today.

  • Check out Don Watkins’ new article over at the American on the common equation of successful businessmen with “greedy capitalists”.  The comparison often made between crooks like Bernie Madoff and successful businessmen such as Bill Gates or Steve Jobs are erroneous at best.  On the contrary, the two are polar opposites.
  • Ari Armstrong points out the new problem posed by Obamacare in Under ObamaCare, “The Doctor Can’t See You Now”
  • The Republicans are just as guilty as the Democrats regarding our growing welfare state.  Michael A. Laferrara discusses the supposed “cuts” from SNAP proposed by Republicans.  The important point to note, however, is that no entity in Washington questions the morality of federal assistance and its growing role in the daily lives of Americans.
  • Indeed, federal assistance has become its own institution in Washington, often dominating political issues as fundamental and basic as the fiscal budget.  The current shutdown is a result not of politics in itself, but a fundamental disagreement between left and right on the scope of government involvement, symbolized most prominently by Obamacare.  The Senate rejection of House budget proposals along with current polls of Obamacare indicate that Washington listens little to the people when making decisions that affect them on a daily basis.

In every poll conducted by eight major national pollsters this year, opposition to the Affordable Care Act outweighs support. In the September 2013 CBS News/New York Times poll, for example, 39 percent of respondents approve of the law and 51 percent disapprove. In the mid-September Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 39 percent have a favorable view of it and 43 percent an unfavorable one. The late September CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll found 38 percent in favor and 57 percent opposed.

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What is it About Economics…The Debt Deal Examined

Given that it’s debt talk time in Washington, I thought I would repost my discussion from 2011. Given that Washington is still behaving the same, my discussion – with the exception of statistics cited – is still relevant. Indeed, after last year’s S&P credit rating downgrade of the U.S. and the Federal Reserve’s continued spending, the debt ceiling issue should be in the forefront of everyone’s mind. Below are a few other articles concerning Washington spending.

kapitalcon

Government spending is out of control.  The national debt is almost equal to GDP (97%).  Unemployment is at 9.6% officially, almost 20% unofficially.  The debt ceiling game in Washington leaves little room for comfort among middle class Americans and investors.  A U.S. credit downgrade is imminent.  The future is not bright.  So what is it about economics that leaves so many people (on many occasions myself included) confused and bewildered into a state of apathy?  After all, are we not taught the fundamental aspects of economics, namely that competition preserves ingenuity, the law of demand determines fair (market) prices, and that a market free of government encourages investment for future growth because the market is the amalgamation of millions of choices – for America approximately 311 million.  So long as these phenomena are allowed to occur unimpeded, the path toward prosperity continues.  As more jobs are created and more products…

View original post 871 more words

The key idea here for me is the snowball mentality of government, namely that government grows out of its misconstrued notion of a savior. The paradox of this is quite clear if one agrees with “Mitchell’s Law.”

International Liberty

The mess in Europe has been rather frustrating, largely because almost everybody is on the wrong side.

Some folks say they want “austerity,” but that’s largely a code word for higher taxes. They’re fighting against the people who say they want “growth,” but that’s generally a code word for more Keynesian spending.

So you can understand how this debate between higher taxes and higher spending is like nails on a chalkboard for someone who wants smaller government.

And then, to get me even more irritated, lots of people support bailouts because they supposedly are needed to save the euro currency.

When I ask these people why a default in, say, Greece threatens the euro, they look at me as if it’s the year 1491 and I’ve declared the earth isn’t flat.

So I’m delighted that the Wall Street Journal has published some wise observations by a leading French…

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Ron Paul Speaks on Government Coercion and Failure

In the following video, Ron Paul lays out the conditions upon which Washington has usurped the American dream. Deficit spending, inflationary threats, the Federal Reserve, and wealth redistribution through the primary hub of government bureaucracy are all points of contention needing more open debate and general awareness among the people.  Mr. Paul discusses these with welcomed candor.

In addition, Paul speaks on the Washington’s newest threats to liberty and privacy, passage of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), and most recently, the deployment of drones over American airspace.  It is a proven fact that as any government grows in size and influence, the people’s basic rights diminish at an equal rate.  Just taking a look at recent legislation from the Patriot Act to Obamacare to the NDAA paints a frightful picture of a Washington elite increasingly relying on coercion at a time when their policies are loosing popularity.

Take a look at the video and please feel free to pass it along to all you know.

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Obama’s American Jobs Act Spends More for Economic Recovery, Perpetuates Keynesian Myth

President Obama delivered his jobs speech this evening, which focused on job creation via tax breaks for small businesses, cuts in payroll taxes, and more infrastructure projects.  This is the usual rhetoric coming out of Washington and many will liken it simply to a last-ditch effort of the White House to improve polling numbers going into the campaign season.  But we should not focus on such drivel.  Rather what should be noted is that only one month after averting a U.S. sovereign default and seeing our credit rating downgraded for the first time in nearly a century, stimulus spending in the name of economic recovery has not left Washington, as it is at the heart of this legislation.  President Obama stated:

The purpose of the American Jobs Act is simple: to put more people back to work and more money in the pockets of those who are working. It will create more jobs for construction workers, more jobs for teachers, more jobs for veterans, and more jobs for the long-term unemployed. It will provide a tax break for companies who hire new workers, and it will cut payroll taxes in half for every working American and every small business. It will provide a jolt to an economy that has stalled, and give companies confidence that if they invest and hire, there will be customers for their products and services. You should pass this jobs plan right away.

via Google Images

Wow!  I am so glad we learned our lesson about unrestrained spending and fiscal prudence.  Oh wait, President Obama also stated that every piece of this legislation is paid for.  But this depends not on dollars we currently have saved in some bunker beneath the White House or the U.S. Treasury.  The money that will pay for the American Jobs Act is that which has yet to be saved.  Recall the Budget Control Act passed last month to avert a default on U.S. credit.  It called for nearly $1 trillion in immediate cuts, but the term “immediately” in Washington-speak actually means spread out over the next ten years.  So we are to pay for this legislation, much of it with immediate costs, with spending cuts that will be enacted under a different Congress and Executive? Really?  But wait, there is also the additional $1.5 trillion in spending cuts to be determined by our beloved “Super Congress” before the end of the year.  But the likelihood that such cuts will see the balance sheet within the Obama administration, or even the next, is not likely.

Here are some more reasons why Congress should pass yet another Keynesian policy, despite the utter failure of its predecessors.

  • Pass this jobs bill, and starting tomorrow, small businesses will get a tax cut if they hire new workers or raise workers’ wages.
  • Pass this jobs bill, and all small business owners will also see their payroll taxes cut in half next year.
  • Pass this jobs bill, and thousands of teachers in every state will go back to work.
  • Pass this jobs bill, and companies will get extra tax credits if they hire America’s veterans.
  • Pass this jobs bill, and companies will get a $4,000 tax credit if they hire anyone who has spent more than six months looking for a job.
  • Pass this jobs bill, and the typical working family will get a fifteen hundred dollar tax cut next year.

The bottom line is this.  Our government continues to spend and propose additional spending in the name of economic recovery with little results and an empty wallet to boot.  The results at this point are certain.  Any recovery proposed by Washington policy hounds or the President will fail because two things must happen for a recovery: (1) decreased government spending, and (2) increased spending in the private sector to fuel consumption.  Yet, our government is stuck in the ideological misnomer of Keynesian stimulus spending.  Consequently, they seek to accomplish private sector growth by crowding our private sector markets.  It is an economical contradiction and illuminates the lunacy of Washington politics.

The best policy that could come out of Washington at this point is no policy at all.  But that is not the take of our beloved President.  He made his ideological stance on the government’s role in the free market quite clear.  “As I’ve argued since I ran for this office, we have to look beyond the immediate crisis and start building an economy that lasts into the future – an economy that creates good, middle-class jobs that pay well and offer security.”  By “we” he does not mean the American people, but Congress and the Executive.  Despite the rhetoric of Washington politics looking to and “representing” the people, their record demonstrates actions often to the contrary.  So one must conclude from this statement that the intent is not to let the markets recover on their own, but to continue crowding out any chance at a recovery now and in the near to mid future.  The only substantive impact of increased spending now is increased taxes later, but without an economy to raise wages enough to offset such tax increases we will all see a real decline in living standards.  Welcome to the new America!

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